Florida Farmer of the Year

Lynetta Usher Griner was named the 2018 Florida Farmer of the Year by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation for her work as a community and state leader.

 
 
 Lynetta Usher Griner and her husband, Ken Griner, laugh at each other while standing in a peanut field outside of a timber harvest site.

Lynetta Usher Griner and her husband, Ken Griner, laugh at each other while standing in a peanut field outside of a timber harvest site.

 
 

In 1989, Lynetta Usher Griner's 29-year-old bother Tommy was killed in a boating accident. At the time, Lynetta was an attorney in Chiefland and a young mother. Her husband, Ken Griner, owned and operated Cross City car dealership. Lynetta ultimately ended up making the decision to take over the Usher family farm and has been running it ever since. Recently, Lynetta was named the 2018 Florida Farmer of the Year by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation at 62 years old for her work as a community and state leader. 

 
 
 Stacks of timber cut down by Usher Land & Timber lie ready for pickup in a half harvested lot.

Stacks of timber cut down by Usher Land & Timber lie ready for pickup in a half harvested lot.

 
It’s a huge win for forestry because it gives the industry another platform.
— Lynetta Usher Griner
 
 Left to right, Korey Griner, Lynetta Usher Griner, Ken Griner and Eric Handley pose for a portrait on their property. Lynetta said Farmer of the Year belongs to her son, husband and business partner as well because the farm is a group effort. 

Left to right, Korey Griner, Lynetta Usher Griner, Ken Griner and Eric Handley pose for a portrait on their property. Lynetta said Farmer of the Year belongs to her son, husband and business partner as well because the farm is a group effort. 

 Calves cluster in the shade inside a pen during early morning cattle processing.

Calves cluster in the shade inside a pen during early morning cattle processing.

 Korey Griner, Lynetta Usher Griner's son, takes notes on which calves have received vaccines during early morning cattle processing.

Korey Griner, Lynetta Usher Griner's son, takes notes on which calves have received vaccines during early morning cattle processing.

 
This honor is special because I feel like it’s encompassing of my family’s work. It covers more of the whole picture instead of just me.
— Lynetta Usher Griner
 
 
 Lynetta Usher Griner walks her horse out of the cattle pens during processing.

Lynetta Usher Griner walks her horse out of the cattle pens during processing.

 
 Korey Griner puts his hands on the levers in preparation to secure a calf for vaccination during cattle processing

Korey Griner puts his hands on the levers in preparation to secure a calf for vaccination during cattle processing

 Farmhands give calves various vaccines during early morning cattle processing.

Farmhands give calves various vaccines during early morning cattle processing.

 
The beauty of this place is a testament to my parents hard work. We’re just caretakers of what they’ve established.
— Lynetta Usher Griner
 
 Rows of timber fly by the window as Lynetta Usher Griner drives around her property. 

Rows of timber fly by the window as Lynetta Usher Griner drives around her property. 

 
 Lynetta Usher Griner points to spots of land that Usher Land & Timber, Inc. owns on a map of Levy County. 

Lynetta Usher Griner points to spots of land that Usher Land & Timber, Inc. owns on a map of Levy County.